Language techniques and effects: how to analyse language
Main Subject
Key stage
Category: Writing Using literary and rhetorical devices
This is a digital download product
Contributor: jill carter
Published: 11/09/2018
Updated: 11/09/2018
Resource type
Worksheet

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31977.pdf178.69 KB
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Description
A detailed resource to support students in their analysis of language.

All reviews

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5

18/02/2021

Very useful as it helps learner understand the topic better

Olufunke Agbedejobi

13/02/2021

5

25/10/2020

To support with 1-1 tutoring. Thank you very much.

Rosalind Tucker

16/04/2020

5

18/02/2021

Very useful as it helps learner understand the topic better

Olufunke Agbedejobi

13/02/2021

5

25/10/2020

To support with 1-1 tutoring. Thank you very much.

Rosalind Tucker

16/04/2020

5

06/03/2020

The resource used for home education. KS3 book mentions assonance and rhyme too.

Mariann Lau

05/02/2020

5

09/01/2020

5

08/01/2020

5

14/09/2019

Below are some possible effects I add in an additional column - these are generic but may help students to express ideas.

Possible Effects
Simile: Helps the reader to visualize ideas
Metaphor: Helps the reader to visualise ideas
Personification: Adds life-like effects
Sensory detail: Encourages the reader to imagine what is seen, smelt, heard, touched or felt.
Tricolon: Creates rhythm and emphasis.
Repetiton: Emphasises/ highlights/ reinforces ideas or feelings.
Alliteration: Draws attention to ideas or feelings. Slows the reader down. Increases pace / punch.
Onomatopoeia: Creates sound effects.
Contrasts: Highlights / emphasises / reinforces differences.
Powerful vocabulary: Influences how a reader reacts to ideas / adds impact / adds weight to ideas
Emotive language: Generates sympathy / other emotional reactions e.g. anger / shock.
Noticeable punctuation: Conveys a sense of pace / drama / emotion / suspense. Adds impact.
Sentence structure:
a) Adds a sense of urgency / drama / interruption or alters pace
b) Creates layers of detail / generates a sense of wandering / slows the reader
Exaggeration: Generates humour or sarcasm. Creates stronger reactions.
Informal language: Makes the text seem more natural and relaxed. Reflects character.
Rhetorical question: Encourages the reader to think or react. Involves the reader.
Unusual vocabulary: Presents ideas in a relevant, convincing or realistic way.
Symbolism: Triggers associations / suggests deeper underlying concepts
Wordplay: Provokes thought or amusement.

jill carter

10/09/2019