KS3 Comprehension teaching pack

Last updated: 09/08/2022
Contributor: Julie Hopkins
KS3 Comprehension
Main Subject
Key stage
Resource type
Teaching pack

What's included?

KS3 Comprehension contains 6 self-contained text extracts with reading comprehension worksheet questions, accompanied by model answers.

This pack is versatile enough to be used in class, or as a sequence of homework tasks, end-of-term/year assessments and cover lessons.

KS3 Comprehension helps students complete the transition from primary to secondary level and provides an effective introduction to 19th century and early 20th century literature. The extracts are suitable for year 7 and year 8 reading comprehension lessons and can be used to supplement existing schemes of work.

NB – this pack is an adapted version of Teachit Primary’s ‘Comprehension’ pack, containing newly commissioned KS3 curriculum questions, replacement texts and a selection of supporting resources.

What's inside?

Introduction (pages 3-4)

Extract 1 – Five Children and It by E. Nesbitt (Pages 5-10)

Extract 2 – The Wonderful Wizard of Oz by Frank L. Baum (pages 11-17)

Extract 3 – Alice’s Adventures in Wonderland by Lewis Carroll (pages 18-23)

Extract 4 – Odin’s Reward by Mary H. Foster and Mabel H. Cummings (pages 24-30)

Extract 5 – The Canterville Ghost by Oscar Wilde (pages 31-38)

Extract 6 – Great Expectations by Charles Dickens (pages 39-45)

Additional resources to support reading comprehension (page 46)

This sample shows the comprehension questions for Alice’s Adventures in Wonderland by Lewis Carroll:

1. Why is there not a moment to be lost?    

2. ‘… away went Alice like the wind ...’ What does the simile ‘like the wind’ tell you?    

3. Look at the paragraph which begins: ‘There were doors all round the hall …’ 
Why is Alice walking ‘sadly’ in this paragraph?    

4. ‘... but, alas! either the locks were too large, or the key was too small’
Which of the following is closest in meaning to ‘alas’?
    Interestingly!        Oh dear!        Amazing!        Surprise!

5. What does the author’s use of this word ‘alas’ suggest to us about how Alice feels?     

6. In the next sentence beginning ‘However …’ Alice’s feelings change. Explain what this change is, and how you know (try to use a quotation).    

7. In the next line ‘… even if my head would go through,” thought poor Alice …’ the author calls her ‘poor’. Why?

8. How do we know that Alice feels more cheerful after drinking the contents of the bottle?
Is it because the author tells us: 
a. she found the taste of the drink ‘very nice’ so she ‘finished it off’,
b. she has a ‘curious feeling’ or
c. ‘her face brightened’. 

9. What clues are there that Alice is someone who doesn’t give up easily? 

10. At the end, why does Alice ‘sit down and cry’?
    
Extension task
Write the next two paragraphs of the story. In your writing, you need to ensure that the following questions are answered:
a. Does Alice get the key?
b. Does Alice open the door to the garden?
c. Does the White Rabbit / another character appear?

KS3 Comprehension
£12.50
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5

29/07/2021

5

20/07/2021

For Home Education. Thanks so much.

Donna Preshous

06/07/2021

5
Useful to support students in the Hospital education service - thank you!

Annabel Wall

05/07/2021

5

29/07/2021

5

20/07/2021

For Home Education. Thanks so much.

Donna Preshous

06/07/2021

5
Useful to support students in the Hospital education service - thank you!

Annabel Wall

05/07/2021

5

05/07/2021

5

03/07/2021

Fantastic pack, thank you

Amanda Hoynes

02/07/2021

5

02/07/2021

Hope to use it as an extension for able ESL students

Marie Rowtham

01/07/2021

5

01/07/2021